Looking at the Glass Half Full

As we close in on the start to the Jewish New Year, I am focused on the spiritual practice of focusing on life being half full. We have a very common way of greeting one another after the usual hellos and salutations.

“What’s wrong?” is a common question asked when we are catching up with someone. We either assume (1) Something is wrong, or (2) They seem like something is wrong, or (3) We are interested in what’s wrong.

Well, I don’t like that question! What would it be like if instead of asking what’s wrong we asked one another: “What’s right?” What if we began to look for what is right, what is working. What if we shared and focused on what is going well, what is positive? Think about your conversations throughout the day with people. How different would they feel or sound if we focused on sharing what is going well, if we shared what is positive and what is right?

This month, as we shift into new beginnings, new year, new weather — focus on asking a new question to those around you. Ask folks to tell you what is not wrong- but to share with you what actually is going right!

Blessings, Deb
Stepping Stones

About Deb Dusansky

Deb has been a Jewish educator for over 20 years directing and teaching children, adults, and families. She is currently the director for Boulder Stepping Stones, an independent family education opportunity for interfaith and Jewish unaffiliated. Deb has been in private practice for over 14 years counseling individuals, couples, and families. She specializes in spiritually centered counseling.

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