Hadassah Presents Virtual Tour of National Portrait Gallery

Join Boulder Hadassah on Sunday May 23rd at 11:15am for a private docent-led virtual one hour tour, via Zoom, of the National Portrait Gallery, featuring people of the Jewish faith who helped shape our history and culture.  If a picture is worth 1,000 words, then the legacies of these individuals speak volumes to us today. The tour will cover the person in the portrait and the portrait itself, if it is relevant.

The National Portrait Gallery, part of The Smithsonian, houses an impressive collection of nearly 23,000 works of art. This virtual interactive tour will enable you to view the portraits more closely and to explore the lives of the sitters in greater depth than possible in a traditional museum setting.  Lorna Grenadier, a long-time NPG docent and history maven, will highlight several portraits. You may be surprised what you’ll discover.

Register at https://secure2.convio.net/wzoa/site/Ticketing?view=Tickets&id=105097  Zoom link provided after registration. No charge. Donations accepted. For questions, please call 720-526-2004 or email boulderhadassah.org. Subject line: Portrait.

About Shirley Gang

Longtime Boulder resident and active participant in Boulder Hadassah. Our chapter strives to bring our members and associates programming to create community, advocate for women's rights, promote health and well-being around the world, support Hadassah hospitals in Israel, and provide information on issues of concern.

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