A YEAR OF COVID-19: Blessings and Loss

There is no denying it, Boulder County residents have all been affected by Covid-19. Whether they are among the 6% infected by the virus, the 7% who are out of work, or the 31,000 students in the Boulder Valley School District, each person has suffered a loss, “and each loss is significant to that person,” says Rabbi Marc Soloway of Congregation Bonai Shalom.

“Whether it is the loss of a relative or friend, of a playdate or prom, whether it is not being able to participate in sports or sing in the school musical, or even go to a restaurant. These are all losses that we need to recognize,” adds Rabbi Marc. “The emotional impact of isolation and limited human contact is incredibly profound.”

In response to seeing so many people suffer on so many levels, the rabbis of Haver have decided to mark the one-year anniversary of Covid-19 in Boulder with a special program that acknowledges those losses but also offers hope and a path toward healing.

“I know that there’s a lot of hurt out there,” says Rabbi Fred Greene of Congregation Har HaShem, “but I believe in the power of hope. Hope isn’t just wishful thinking. It is a conviction, a worldview. So, not only do I believe that we will get through this, together, but I believe we can learn from our struggles and these hardships to make life more meaningful and joyful.”

The virtual program, “A Year of Covid-19: Blessings and Loss” takes place on Sunday, March, 14th at 7p.m. Several rabbis from the Rabbinic Council of Boulder will share their personal experiences and guide attendees from tragedy and loss to gratitude and blessings. “It’s an interactive format that we hope will build community and connection,” says Rabbi Marc who is the program chair.

The date was deliberately chosen, too. “It’s between Purim, the last holiday in 2020 that we were able to gather together in person and Pesach, the first holiday of 2020 that we spent apart.” March 14th also correlates to the 1st of Nisan, which is the first month of the Hebrew Calendar and one of the four New Years recognized in Judaism. “Everyone could use a new beginning right about now,” says Rabbi Diane Tiferet Lakein of Congregation Nevei Kodesh, “and what better way to start a new year than by reminding ourselves of the resilience, resourcefulness and strength we have demonstrated this past one.”

Registration for this Zoom event is free and open to the public. Click here for details and to register.

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