Rabbi Marc’s A Dash of Drash – Smiling Behind a Mask is Episode 107

Smiling behind a Mask is Episode 107 of a Dash of Drash.

Today is Lag BaOmer, the 33rd day of counting towards Sinai. As well as bonfires, this is a festival whose themes include the power of the eyes and the mouth.  I have been pondering the question of how to greet each other during these days and how to smile from behind a mask out on the trail.What will happen when we come out of the isolation of our caves?    
I hope we can be kind.

Lag BaOmer also marks the end of the plague that killed 24,000 students of Rabbi Akiva.  May this plague end soon!

Listen here on Soundcloud or on itunes here.
Thanks for listening with a generous heart and sharing with others!

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About Rabbi Marc Soloway

Marc is a native of London, England where he was an actor and practitioner of complimentary medicine before training as a rabbi in London, Jerusalem and Los Angeles. He was ordained at the Ziegler School of Rabbinical Studies at the American Jewish University in 2004 and has been the the spiritual leader at Bonai Shalom in Boulder ever since. Marc was a close student of Rabbi Zalman Schechter Shalomi and received an additional smicha (rabbinic ordination) from him in 2014, just two months before he died. He has been the host and narrator of two documentary films shown on PBS; A Fire in the Forest: In Search of the Baal Shem Tov and Treasure under the Bridge: Pilgrimage to the Hasidic Masters of Ukraine. Marc is a graduate of the Institute of Jewish Spirituality, a fellow of Rabbis Without Borders, has traveled to Ghana in a rabbinic delegation with American Jewish World Service and co-chair of the Rabbinical Council and national board member of Hazon, which strives to create more sustainable Jewish communities. In 2015, Marc was among a group of 12 faith leaders honored at The White House as “Champions of Change” for work on the climate. Marc is a proud member of Beit Izim, Boulder’s Jewish goat milking co-op.

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One comment

  1. what profound parallels! May we step into our ancestors shoes with even more empathy to the plight of the stricken and the poor students who were the most vulnerable to losing life during a plague.And the request to be kind. Yes, we should be kind. It's the last vestige of civilization.