Letter: “Two Letters, Big Difference”?

To the Editor:

CU’s Spring 2019 Coloradan featured an article about Hebrew. The piece, written by Sam Linnerooth, is called “Two Letters, Big Difference.”  The title is a misnomer.

Linnerooth’s article explains how a “third gender” for Hebrew words is created by adding the “eh suffix.”  The “eh” ending, though, is a vowel sound. “Two letters” were not added.

The Hebrew example in the piece (the Hebrew word for student) shows the feminine form of the word retaining the last letter—hey–or the “h”. The vowel before the hey changed from a kamatz  ( “ah” sound typically used in the feminine form of the word) to a segol (“eh” sound typically used in the masculine form of the word). In short, the “eh” ending blends masculine and feminine endings, but the “e” is not a Hebrew letter.I hope CU’s alumni publication will clarify the issue and make a correction. (And, for the record, there should have been a dagesh (a dot) in the tav–the first Hebrew letter in the word for student.)

E. Bell, a CU graduate who used to work for Congregation Har HaShemHouston, TX

About Staff

They call me "NewsHound IV," because I'm a clever Finnegan, sniffing out stories all over the Boulder area. I love Jewish holidays because the food is GREAT, especially the brisket. Well all the food. I was a rescue pup and glad to be on the scent!

Check Also

Column: Deep in the Heartlessness of Texas: Is Abortion Law an Antisemitic Plot?

Jewish Texans, estimated to number 176,000, should probably worry about the deep in the heartlessness of the Texas abortion law - with the reporting of Amanda Eid’s near-death experience.

Column: Road to the Jewish White House

Jared Polis, Joshua Shapiro and Lee Zeldin ended the day, on Tuesday, Nov. 8, able to claim vast political accomplishments. All three can be credited with consolidating or augmenting power in their states for their respective political parties.

%d bloggers like this: