The explosive, fiery "Aftermath"

“Aftermath” Explodes Onto the Film Festival Screen

There seems to be a theme emerging in international cinema in recent years. While Holocaust films have been produced in abundance not only in America but throughout Europe since 1960, many countries are beginning to shed light on shameful chapters in their treatment of Jews.

The explosive, fiery "Aftermath"
The explosive, fiery “Aftermath

Ida,” which I introduced at BIFF, looked at the legacy of post-Holocaust, Communist Poland and the continued decimation of Jewish life.

"Ida"
Ida

In the Shadows,” the film that sold out our festival on Monday night, is film noir thriller about the show trils of Jews in post-Holocaust Communist Czechoslovakia.

In the Shadows
In the Shadows

And “Aftermath,” which we will present in the Dairy’s Performance Hall Wednesday night at 7 pm, (tickets available!) is about two brothers in contemporary Poland who stumble on the painful truth of their town’s Holocaust past.

Aftermath filled with suspense and tension
Aftermath” filled with suspense and tension

This suspenseful drama, which wowed me when I saw it at the Jerusalem Film Festival in July – where it won the Yad Vashem Chairman’s Award – is stunning. I find it remarkable that this harrowing and damning film, like “Ida,” was made by a non-Jewish Polish director.

This fact-based story was actually banned in some cinemas in Poland. In theme it resembles Germany’s 1990 groundbreaking and fact-based “The Nasty Girl,” but its style is far more explosive.

Based on “Neighbors,” published to acclaim and controversy by Polish-American historian Jan Gross, the film took seven years to acquire funding and ignited huge controversy in Poland, where is was widely denounced, and Poland’s largest weekly ran a cover with the lead actor’s image framed in a Jewish star.

The screening will be followed by a talkback by Professor Paul Shankman.

For tickets, click here.

About Kathryn Bernheimer

Kathryn has spent her professional life writing about, teaching, and presenting the arts. Founding Director of the Boulder Jewish Film Festival, Kathryn was Director of Menorah and ACE at the Boulder JCC from 2003 through August, 2019. The former film and theater critic for the Boulder Daily Camera, Kathryn is the author of "The Fifty Greatest Jewish Movies" and "The Fifty Funniest Films of All Time." kathryn.bernheimer@gmail.com

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