http://www.jccdenver.org/maccabi/

Maccabi Games Scholarships Deadline Monday

http://www.jccdenver.org/maccabi/The Boulder JCC Scholarship Deadline for area teens registered for the Denver JCC Maccabi Games 2010 and/or JCC Maccabi ArtsFest is this Monday, March 15th. Don’t miss this fantastic opportunity.  Scholarship application form and information available at the Boulder JCC website or click here for the form and instruction sheet. Scholarships are made possible by 18 Pomegranates.

It’s not too late to register for Maccabi Games or Maccabi ArtsFest.

Join Team Denver – Sign up to compete in any individual sport (Track and Field, Swimming, Bowling, Golf, Tennis). If sports isn’t your thing, you can sign up as a Star Reporter (writing/photography). Join over 1,500 other teens (ages 12-16) from around the world and across the country for a week of Olympic style competitions, fun evening socials, community service and so much more. Boulder athletes stay with host families in Denver. This is an event not to be missed.

For more information contact Sara at sara@boulderjcc.org or 303-921-6952. Find out more at the Denver Maccabi Games Website.

Adult volunteers are needed too – be part of the event! Sign up to volunteer today at the Denver Maccabi Games Website and be part of the biggest Jewish event ever in Colorado!

About Sara Goldberg

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