Messinger Gallery Opening: The Photography of Norman Koren

We are thrilled to welcome you to the Messinger Gallery for the opening of a new exhibition by photographer Norman Koren. 

Norman Koren’s photography attempts to express the hidden life in intricate, often overlooked details of nature, as well as in old towns and buildings that express the deep individuality of their creators. He is especially attracted to complex abstract designs found in the natural environment, such as lichens on rocks, which evoke realms beyond their subject matter—mysterious planets, magical eggs, and sacred mountains to mention a few.

Norman’s interest in photography started while growing up in Rochester, NY, near the George Eastman House— the great photographic museum that displayed prints of the masters (Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and others) as well as historical and contemporary cameras. Both the artistic and technical displays made a deep impression on him.

During Norman’s 34-year career in magnetic recording technology, which took him to Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, northern and Southern California, and finally to Boulder in 1998, photography was his primary passion. Norman studied Ansel Adams’ basic photo series, attended a number of workshops, became proficient in photographic printing, and even taught a few evening courses. He became interested in digital printing after arriving in Boulder, and in 2001 created a website to share what he learned in the process. This led to developing a program, Imatest, for analyzing the quality of digital cameras, which keeps him busy to this day.

Wednesday, September 7 | 5:30 – 7:00 pm | FREE | REGISTER HERE

This program will be held in person at the Boulder JCC following all of our Health & Safety Protocols. Please familiarize yourself with these protocols prior to the event. As always, all Health & Safety protocols are subject to change.

About Jill Lowitz

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