Thank You from JTree and The Nature Conservancy

Meet the Seed Ball scientists and learn how many trees the Boulder Jewish Community has planted to date!

Join a Zoom call on Monday, November 16 @ 3:30 pm by clicking the link:
https://tnc.zoom.us/j/94984556881

Thank you Volunteers!

JTree volunteers created the seed pellets (also called seed balls) using locally-collected ponderosa pine seeds. These balls were used in The Nature Conservancy’s Colorado re-forestation efforts, and in the spring, the seeds will germinate and trees will start to grow!

Why seed pellets (“Seed Balls”)?

  • Innovative technology with seedpods – may make reforestation easier, faster, and cheaper.  
  • Usually, reforestation is a 2-3 year process.  Seeding using pellets could reduce project time, as it eliminates the need for growth in a nursery 
  • Seeding may reduce costs and staffing needs of over-taxed land managers.  
  • Seed pellets can increase the scale of reforestation and close the gap on the widening tree deficit caused by wildfires. 
  • Drones can safely seed areas that are inaccessible to field crews, areas which are far from roads.  
  • Our seed pellets are designed to protect seeds from animals, but also to easily break down come spring, once there is a hard rain.  Then, they dissolve, and the seeds are exposed.  These are the precise conditions for germination.  
  • Once free from the seed pellet, ponderosa pine seeds need mineral soil – very rocky soil — that is continuously warm and moist in order to grow.   

About Natalie Portman-Marsh

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