Lafayette Mayor Carolyn Cutler lights the 2012 menorah.

Giant Menorah Lighting in Lafayette’s Festival Plaza on Night 5

Boulder County’s Largest Menorah Lights up the Night Sky

LAFAYETTE, CO: Jewish tradition teaches that no matter how dark it gets we must strive to bring light. No holiday celebrates this concept more than Chanukah, which requires lighting one more candle each night until we have filled the eight-branched menorah or chanukia and brought light to the darkness.

A relatively new tradition, each year more and more people brave the variable weather to come together to watch the lighting of Boulder County’s Largest Menorah in Festival Plaza in Old Town Lafayette.

This year’s entertainment includes a special acrobatic performance by Sven Jorgensen and sufganiot (traditional jelly doughnuts). No reservations are required for this special event. Just bundle up and join the party in Festival Plaza in Old Town Lafayette on Wednesday night, December 28th at 5:00 pm.

The annual lighting of the giant menorah is sponsored by the Boulder County Center for Judaism, with JEWISHcolorado and the Oreg Foundation, without whose assistance this event would not be possible.

For more information, call 303-494-1638 or email BoulderJudaism@gmail.com.

About Chany Scheiner

Co - Director of Boulder Center for Judaism. Any successful organization needs a heart and that is what Chany provides, along with organization, marketing, innovative programming, and countless Shabbat dinners. Some of her accomplishments are large and public like the annual menorah lighting on Pearl Street and the matzo and shofar factories, while others are quiet and private like the time she spends counseling individuals and sharing the wisdom that comes from study.

Check Also

This Week at Nevei Kodesh, April 16-21

Nevei Kodesh, a warm and welcoming Jewish Renewal Community invites you to join us virtually for prayer, study and connection!

“It Started With Words” – Holocaust Survivors Give Stunning Testimonies To Mark Holocaust Remembrance Day

Before local anti-Jewish laws were enacted, before neighborhood shops and synagogues were destroyed, and before Jews were forced into ghettos, cattle cars, and camps, words were used to stoke the fires of hate. #ItStartedWithWords is a digital, Holocaust education campaign posting weekly videos of survivors from around the world reflecting on those moments that led up to the Holocaust – a period of time when they could not have predicted the ease with which their long-time neighbors, teachers, classmates, and colleagues would turn on them, transitioning from words of hate to acts of violence.