Rabbi Pesach Scheiner

Through Thick and Thin

Rabbi Pesach Scheiner
Rabbi Pesach Scheiner

In last week’s Torah portion, we discussed how sacrifices encapsulated our service to G-d, since by offering an animal a person was visually reminded that he must also offer himself, i.e. his passion and talents to G-d.  In this week’s Torah portion, we learn about the primary sacrifice in the Temple which was called the Tamid offering.  Tamid means steady and this sacrifice consisted of two lambs and a flour offering.  The first lamb was the first offering offered on the altar in the morning and the second lamb was the last offering brought on the altar each day.

Regarding this Tamid sacrifice the verse states “One lamb shall be offered in the morning and the second towards the evening.” The commentaries explain that this verse contains a very important message, morning is symbolic of good times when a person’s life is full of light and evening is symbolic of difficult times when a person’s world is dark.  The Torah is telling us that just as we are expected to come close to G-d in the good times, we are likewise expected to become close in difficult times.

The history of the Jewish people and how Jewish people acted under the most difficult persecution is a testimony to these words of the Torah.  Just this past week a family in Brooklyn suffered a tragedy that cannot adequately be described in words. But, anyone who saw the father speak at the funeral of his seven children or the subsequent interviews he gave to the media, can see how in these most difficult moments, his faith and passion are unshakeable.

About Rabbi Pesach Scheiner

Rabbi Pesach Scheiner is the Rabbi of Boulder County Center for Judaism. In addition, he teaches extensively throughout Boulder County and is the author of "Finding the Joy in Everyday Living," a book of short chapters explaining the ways to access happiness through appreciation, gratitude, and a sense of purpose.

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