Some Thoughts on Current Events

We live in very contentious times. Our society is pitted against each other. Everyone agrees that the situation is unhealthy for our own society and can also have disastrous global effects. When we are fighting one another, it is more difficult to see things objectively.

I would like to bring some tips and teachings of Judaism that can help us bring more unity.

1-The Torah in Leviticus states; “You shall not hate your brother in your heart.” In Jewish law, there are very few exceptions to this rule. Judaism explains that although it is natural to hate someone who caused you pain and discomfort, we have to do our best to overcome hatred.

2-In Ethics of Our Fathers it states: “..And Judge every person favorably”.  Sometimes we are too quick to criticize others, we don’t take the time to try to understand their thought process or why they did certain things that we don’t approve of.  This teaching tells us to always try to think of some redeeming factor when judging others.

3-Judaism teaches that sometimes there can be more than one truth. There can be different perspectives that all have value. However, the greatest truth can sometimes come from a compromise that combines various perspectives.

May we all do our utmost to bring more peace and goodness into the world.

About Rabbi Pesach Scheiner

Rabbi Pesach Scheiner is the Rabbi of Boulder County Center for Judaism. In addition, he teaches extensively throughout Boulder County and is the author of "Finding the Joy in Everyday Living," a book of short chapters explaining the ways to access happiness through appreciation, gratitude, and a sense of purpose.

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