My Final Weeks in India

Author Stephanie Schneider with friends

My internship in India is slowly coming to an end. I will be presenting my final project the last two days in January. It has been an amazing adventure getting to this point and yet I wonder to myself, “Have I even scratched the surface of what needs to be done?”

I am creating a committee of volunteers in the organization I am in who will carry on performing essential functions for their growth. The volunteers are a committed group of professionals who have come together with different skills and experiences for the cause of fighting to keep children in school.

In my final weeks here, I wonder if I have done as much as I could have. I suppose that is the great question of everyone who goes abroad to serve. Living and working in India gives me a new appreciation for all the privileges I have had through my life, one being the education I was able to have. Growing up, the only place I had to work was in my studies, I never had to experience what it is like to have to do labor at the age of ten or what it is like to be hungry or want to study but not being informed of my options or that it is even a possibility. I am so blessed to have been able to have this experience and to have met so many wonderful people. The culture, the people, and every experience I have had here will forever impact my life for the better.

About Stephanie Schneider

Bonai Shalom member Stephanie Schneider graduated with Honors from Colorado State University in May, 2011 and is a social justice volunteer for a nine-month program in India and Israel. The program is called Leadership and International Fellowship Experience (LIFE) and is run by B’Tzedek.

Check Also

Katie Couric Wasn’t The First: FDR, Truman And The Jews

Controversy has erupted over the admission by journalist Katie Couric that she doctored her 2016 interview with Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in order to “protect” Ginsburg from criticism of her opposition to athletes kneeling during the national anthem. But Couric joins a growing list of authors who have altered the unflattering words of individuals whom they admire, in order to shield them from embarrassment.

The Teenage Years: Better Run Away

nveloped in my tallit. Our next-door neighbors have two adorable kids, the oldest a loquacious blonde with a favorite game. I watch him try, often successfully, to run away from his house and down the street while his panicked nanny chases him and screams epithets in Spanish. Every day he gets a little farther and she screams a little louder.