It’s a Swinging Shabbat for Kids and Families

mishpachaCongregation Har HaShem’s Mishpacha (Family) Adventures program takes a field trip to Monkey Bizness in the Orchard Town Center in Westminster on Saturday, November 16th from 10 am – noon.

Kick back and relax in the coffee bar as your children engage in an innovative, creative, and fun environment. We will spend the morning playing and praying together at this awesome kids wonderland!

Monkey Bizness is located at 14693 Orchard Parkway in the Orchard Town Center in Westminster.

Register online HERE. The cost is $6.75 per child over age 1; $5.25 per child for crawlers under age 1 year; parents are FREE. A MazelTot discount covers 100% of ticket costs for your immediate family, up to a maximum of $100.

Congregation Har HaShem‘s Mishpacha (Family) Adventures is geared towards families with children preschool-1st grade (and their siblings too). Take tiyuls (trips) around town, create Jewish experiences and memories for your family!

Upcoming adventures include Play! at Grandrabbits; Shabbat Afternoon at the Thompson Tea House; Shabbat Dinner after Tot Shabbat Services; and Kabbalat Shabbat at Sunflower Farms.

For more information, please contact Mishpacha Adventures Coordinator, Marcia Seigal at m.seigal@harhashem.org or call (303) 499-7077 ext. 13.

About Ellen Kowitt

Marketing and Communications Professional. Genealogist. Jewelry Artist. Kehillah Builder.

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