Deb Dusansky presents a thoughtful new perspective on the age-old question.

Half-Full? Or Half-Empty?

Someone shared with me recently a great teaching from a Bat-Mitzvah. The young girl talked about approaching situations as half-empty versus half-full. Everyone is familiar with the belief that being half-full is better than being half-empty. This perspective is so common and accepted. We hear it as children. We hear it at work. Focus on what you have. Focus on being full or at least half- full rather than being empty or feeling empty.

Well, how about thinking of half-empty as being half open to possibility? What if we could turn around the belief that we are half-empty and think of ourselves as being open to what can come in? In other words, develop the perspective that there is room to be filled up by things that Gd/universe/higher power has for us. Being half-empty, or holding that perspective, may actually leave me with more room for me, for life, for newness, abundance and blessings.

Perhaps when we focus on being half-full all the time, we actually close ourselves to possibilities and life that is around us.  Maybe believing that we have everything we need in this moment and that we are full and satisfied in the here and now squelches us to some degree.

I think that the half-empty perspective could push us towards more motivation and possibility. That the drive for betterment and improvement and more comes from a sense of half-empty rather than from a sense of half-full (contentment).

May we all be blessed this month to sink into a taste of half-emptiness. Feel the longing, the drive, and the discomfort. Be open to the possibility of more blessings and abundance coming into your life. Feel the spaciousness and possibilities that could be filled with more life and more blessings.

Blessings, Deb

About Deb Dusansky

Deb has been a Jewish educator for over 20 years directing and teaching children, adults, and families. She is currently the director for Boulder Stepping Stones, an independent family education opportunity for interfaith and Jewish unaffiliated. Deb has been in private practice for over 14 years counseling individuals, couples, and families. She specializes in spiritually centered counseling.

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