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Explore the History of Jewish Pioneers in Boulder

When DID Jews first come to Boulder? The Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado (JGSCO) presents “Boulder Pioneers: Trappers, Traders, Gold Seekers & the Search for a Small Jewish Community” at Congregation Har HaShem, 3950 Baseline Road on Sunday, November 11th from 10 AM to noon.

Before Boulder celebrated its Sesquicentennial in 2009, JGSCO member Dina Carson wondered if it would be possible to establish who had settled in Boulder in those early days using original source documentation. Thinking, “How much could there be to look at?” Dina unleashed an historical research project that is ongoing today. So far, more than 11,000 pre-statehood Boulder pioneers have been identified … and a “small Jewish community nestled at the foot of the Flatirons during the Gold Rush.” Or was there?

Dina will share her story, specifically defining who is a Boulder pioneer, finding the records to prove who was here, gathering and using the records, extracting the data, project challenges, interesting finds, and terrifically tough territorial trivia.

Sponsored by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado, this program is free and open to everyone.

Mentoring for those working on their own personal family history research will immediately follow the program until 1 PM for JGSCO members. JGSCO membership costs $30 annually per individual and $40 per household. For more information, visit www.JGSCO.org or contact info@JGSCO.org.

About Ellen Kowitt

Marketing and Communications Professional. Genealogist. Jewelry Artist. Kehillah Builder.

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