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Is It the Journey or the Destination?

‘THE WHOLE IS GREATER THAN THE SUM OF THE PARTS!’ –ARISTOTLE

I recently had the experience of accomplishing a big goal. What a great feeling — or was it? I have been looking at how it feels to accomplish versus how the journey felt getting there. We live in a society that is so focused on the goals and outcomes.

How much weight did you lose? How much money was the annual bonus? How fast did you run the race?

How different the conversation is when we ask each other or ourselves about the journey. What was your training like? What lifestyle changes have you made to be healthier?

I find myself asking what did I learn or notice on the journey preparing for the goal. What did I discover about myself along the way that helped me be successful and what is my definition of success or accomplishment? Is it about how fast I get there?

The Aristotle quote is so powerful to remind ourselves that the end result, the goal, is fairly insignificant. You are not defined by the last stop — you are on a journey. What is important it seems is that the steps and stops on the journey that make up the whole picture are what define and describe you.

Spend some time this month defining and describing the parts of yourself and your journey that contribute to your whole you. Focus on the parts as rich accomplishments rather than merely focusing on the places they led you to.

Blessings, Deb

 

 

About Deb Dusansky

Deb has been a Jewish educator for over 20 years directing and teaching children, adults, and families. She is currently the director for Boulder Stepping Stones, an independent family education opportunity for interfaith and Jewish unaffiliated. Deb has been in private practice for over 14 years counseling individuals, couples, and families. She specializes in spiritually centered counseling.

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2 comments

  1. Thanks Deb. A really good reminder for all of us who are so caught up in "product" rather than "process."

  2. Every Rosh Hashana I find myself thinking about this exact internal struggle. Throughout the year we lose focus on the importance of living and loving fully. The shofar, as it turns out, is suppose to shock us out of the haze. Even if it’s for a few weeks of conscious living, it’s a yearly ritual that helps make us appreciate life just a little more.