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Community 2nd Night Passover Seder April 19th

Live from Boulder, It’s Second Night!

Congregation Har HaShem hosts a lively community seder on the second night of Passover, this year on April 19th from 5:30-8 PM.

Open to everyone, and titled, “Live From Boulder, It’s Second Night! A Multi-Media Passover Seder for the Mind, Body, and Soul,” this night will be different from all other nights, blending traditional narrative and song, with a modern twist!

What if Passover was not just grandpa mumbling, kids squirming, thee-thou-thy-ing, can we eat now I’m starving, what is this all about anyway, when are we leaving? What if it was a meaningful, participatory, musical, multi-media experience that entertains, inspires, and transforms… all with a delicious catered meal!

Click here for menu and details. An interactive activity for children ages 12 and under will be provided.

The Congregation Har HaShem South Building is located at 3901 Pinon Drive. The regular cost is $40 per adult, $18 per kid 6-13, and FREE for kids 5 and under. RSVP@harhashem.org by Friday, April 15th!

Mazeltot.org ALERT! If you have a child age 4 or younger, you may be eligible for a free seder for the whole family from MazelTot! Call (303) 499-7077 for information.

Do your thing for the first night, and then help us do ours for the second seder at Har HaShem. A night to sing, eat, learn, grow. A night to remember.

About Ellen Kowitt

Marketing and Communications Professional. Genealogist. Jewelry Artist. Kehillah Builder.

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